The live TV streaming issue no one’s talking about

One thing I’ve learned from writing about cord-cutting is that people are particular about their DVRs. If a streaming service’s DVR doesn’t provide the same creature comforts as cable set-top box, it can be a dealbreaker.Case in point: I recently heard from a reader who’d successfully cut cable in favor of DirecTV Now, only to become frustrated with how the service handles ad skipping. While DirecTV Now puts no restrictions on recording shows or jumping past commercials, it offers no visual preview of what you’re skipping when you hit fast forward. Without this visual preview, skipping past commercial breaks requires a lot of trial and error.I decided to dig into the matter, and I discovered that visual preview is a nuanced and occasionally vexing issue in the world of live TV streaming services. The ability to skip past commercials with ease can depend not only on which service you choose, but on the device you’re using and even the button you press to fast forward on your remote. After a whole bunch of testing, here’s what I’ve learned. To read this article in full, please click here https://www.techhive.com/article/3315113/streaming-services/the-live-tv-streaming-issue-no-ones-talking-about.html#tk.rss_streamingmedia…

Making sense of 4K HDR streaming devices

If you plan to buy a new streaming player in 2018, chances are it’s going to support 4K HDR.The new format, which allows for sharper pictures and more vibrant colors, now appears in the majority of Roku and Fire TV players, including the just-announced Roku Premiere, Roku Premiere+, and Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K. It’s also available in the Apple TV 4K, Google’s Chromecast Ultra, and Nvidia’s Shield TV. Research firm IHS expects 97 percent of TVs with 55-inch or larger screens to support 4K resolution this year, so it’s no surprise that we’re seeing more streaming players to match.To read this article in full, please click here …

The case for combining live TV streaming services

Of all the attacks on cord-cutting that we’ve heard over the years, the most common is what I call the “gee whiz” argument: The idea that if you subscribe to a bunch of streaming video services, then gee whiz, the cost of all those subscriptions really adds up. This obvious point is routinely presented as an epiphany by cord-cutting naysayers, none of whom seem to realize that being able to pick and choose is the entire point of ditching cable.This week, however, I’d like to argue in favor of letting things add up. Given what we know about the average cost of traditional pay TV service—it’s about $100 per month for TV alone, according to Leichtman Research Group and my own examination of FCC data—cord-cutters often have plenty of wiggle room to stack up streaming services and still save money.To read this article in full, please click here https://www.techhive.com/article/3305538/streaming-services/the-case-for-combining-live-tv-streaming-services.html#tk.rss_streamingmedia…

HDHomeRun Premium TV could be the holy grail for antenna users

SiliconDust, the company behind the HDHomeRun line of networked TV tuners, has solved one of live TV streaming services’ biggest problems with its new Premium TV offering.For $35 per month, HDHomeRun Premium TV offers 45 live cable channels, including ESPN, HGTV, FX, AMC, and all three major cable news networks. While the package doesn’t include any local broadcast channels, you can add those yourself by connecting an antenna to an HDHomeRun tuner, which itself is required to access the service.What really sets Premium TV apart from other live streaming services is its DVR support, which lets you record over-the-air and cable programming onto a desktop PC or NAS box for an extra $35 per year. Unlike the cloud-based DVRs offered by other live TV services, HDHomeRun’s DVR doesn’t prevent you from skipping ads, block you from recording certain channels, or set limits on how long it’ll keep your recordings. You can even load the video files onto a Plex server or move them to your phone for offline viewing. The DVR is limited only by the size of your hard drive (hard drives, if you’re running a NAS box).To read this article in full, please click here …


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